Travel West

These are my people, I should never have come here.

Martha Wainwright

Factory

Welcome to Part II of Marth Wainwright’s CBC Radio 2 Concert on Demand. Well, my live blog of it.  Part I is yesterday’s post so you can just click back to it if you like.

We kick off part two of this exercise with This Life. I wonder if it’s more of a commentary on what is going on in her life at a moment, or a philsophical treatise. This, this life, right now, is snoring. I guess that answers my question.  Once again we have just Martha and her guitar.  I wish I could adequately describe her singing style. I made an attempt in Part I, but I’m not sure I did it justice.  Her voice almost cycles up and down, like Neko Case in a washing machine. That may seem negative but it is not intended to be.  Halfway through the song we bounce to French, then back to English. The crowd was delighted by the change.

Martha and her mother are now going to get together for one of Kate’s songs, Wise Men.  We are told, in French, that this song is about the war in Afghanistan, and apparently some relationship to the Magi.  What did they see in the sky that made them take leave of their life? Very good question. If there were in fact three wise men, who traveled to Bethlehem, I wonder what they thought when they arrived?  Was it what they expected when they saw a great light in the sky? The song has a strange vibe and reminds me of many a French folk song, even though the lyrics are in English. The combination of voices is almost creepy, yet sweetly satisfying.

Jimi.  I don’t know a thing about this song, but I wonder if this song is at all connected to Jimi Hendrix.  Martha creates unique sonic landscapes that are ethereal, musical, and yet almost not.  It is a collection of sonic postcards from Quebec to Pluto.  The whole band comes out in full force for this one.  The vocal harmonies in this song are at first jarring, but I came to understand that they are supposed to evoke the otherwordly colour of the piece.

Martha moved to New York at some point in her young life, and forged her musical career there.  This one starts out as a jazzy love song, lead by electric guitar and brushed drums.  This song is robably the most obvious one I’ve heard in this set.  It is the most like compositions by other musicians, and thus the least unique.  There is an understated building solo that turns into a duet with her voice.  The guitar tone is fantastic, very dirty and full. After the song she introduces the band. Looking over Martha’s discography, she has featured an astonishing number of guests on her albums. I guess that is one advantage of having famous musician parents.

G.P.T. from her self-titled album is the third-to-last song of the set.  This is a more rock song than anything we’ve heard in this half of the show.  It’s a very catchy tune.  I should probably thank the CBC for putting these concerts online.  It is a great opportunity to enjoy musicians I may not get out to see very often. I imagine if I lived somewhere like Moose Factory, where big musicians seldom go, I’d be even happier about the streaming COD’s.

We now have the first real cover of the night, because covering your mom’s music doesn’t count, Dis Quand Reviendras-Tu by French musician Barbara.  I have not heard the original yet, though I plan on checking out, but I am familiar with some French music.  This is a beautiful song featuring just Martha and piano.  The crowd seems deeply appreciative for this piece.

We finish up with what appears to be the whole family, in attendance, singing Factory. This has been a fun show, and I bet Montreal is the ideal place to see Martha.  This song shows off a lot of what makes Martha a highly entertaining musician.  It must’ve been cool to see the many talented singers together for this final song.  Once again the CBC has given us a fun and enjoyable concery.  Check it out if you’d like an hour or so of great music from one of Canada’s bright musical stars.

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