They Go Twirlin’ Down And Down White Water

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I believe I once linked to this video, but this is the first time it’s been embedded.  This classic Canadian folk song, about an apparently defunct profession is quintessential Canadiana.  No one really makes animated films like this anymore.  The Log Driver’s Waltz was regularly played on TVO when I was a kid, so I am quite familiar with it.  It was one of the films I was desperate to see again, so I have to thank the NFB for giving it to the world for free.

I can understand that some people may not see the purpose of animating an old Canadian folk song.  Obviously, the audience for such a piece is limited.  That was certainly the case in 1979 when John Weldon took a version by Mountain City Four and turned it into a short film. It’s popularity, however, is almost unsurpassed in NFB history.  I think there are two main reasons for this.

First, as was the case for me, many people associate seeing this film with significant parts of their life.  It is directly linked to my childhood, and thus is a nostalgia piece. I’m sure many others share similar memories of the song and the film.

Second, it represents a way of life that is at the core of the Canadian experience.  Many of us who live in the bigger cities of the St. Lawrence/Great Lakes corridor may forget that this country was founded and has thrived on natural resources.  Logging, Pulp and Paper, Mining, Drilling, Fishing, Trapping, and Farming have been the backbone of Canada’s economic development for much of its history. Going forward, the vast supply of fresh water could surpass all of the items on that list. Certainly manufacturing, such as the steel mills of my hometown, have also played a significant role, but it would be hard to argue against natural resources as our greatest strength as a nation.  The Log Driver’s Waltz, without even intending to, casts the young lady in the role of Canada, as she realizes the value of the soft footed labourer against the bankers and doctors of the city.  Without vast natural resources, and the hard work it takes to extract them, there wouldn’t be much of a country here.

I think The Log Driver’s Waltz is an important piece of the cultural history of Canada.  The version heard here is performed in part by Kate and Anna MacGarrigle who showed up in my piece on Martha Wainwright’s concert.  I really believe that tru folk music is the sound of the soul of a nation.  In this case there can be little doubt.

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